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Everybody knows Anne Imhof. For sure everyone knows her after 2017, when she was awarded with the Golden Lion at the Venice Biennale. In the art world the German artist is well-known for her practice composed of body actions, gestures and physical presence, representing a clear attitude against stereotypes and pop culture. 

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Imhof’s aesthetic is dark, deep and very intense. She created a very contemporary language where any frill or excess is useless and ephemeral. Imhof’s imaginary and attitude are highly recognizable, and, through her performances and body movements, the artist allows the public to mirror one’s weaknesses and virtues. Imhof represented Germany at the 2017 Venice Biennale; in 2015 she won the Nationalgalerie Prize for Young Art; in September 2021 a new chapter of her project “Sex” will be open at Castello di Rivoli Museo d’Arte Contemporanea. 

 

Anne Imhof © Sean and Seng for The Travel Almanac.

 

Anne Imhof, Sex (still), 2021. Eliza Douglas. Courtesy of the artist and Galerie Buchholz, Berlin Cologne New York.

 

During the Venice Biennale ongoing performance, German pavilion curator Susanne Pfeffer, talking about Anne Imhof work, explained that the aim of the performance was to represent “how man is changing through the current technological and socioeconomic conditions, and how our concept of the body must be rethought”. 

SMK, The National Gallery of Denmark, is presenting Anne Imhof’s first major film-based work to date. The Danish museum called this international artist who represents one of the most innovative voices of her generation, to show her first filmcomposed of footage created during the first chapter of her performance cycle “Sex” at Tate Modern in March 2019. Focusing on her research in which bodies are displayed into the space turning and changing the meaning of it, her film explores, trough “moving images”, some of her performance pieces. “While adhering to the overall dramaturgical chronology of the performance and matching its durational quality, this new work follows a logic of its own as sequences are slowed down or scenes shot during different performance days, both with and without an audience in attendance, are fused together, the curator wrote. As always happen in her works, the cast of her performers has a fundamental role, for “Sex” is made up of a “core group of performers Imhof has been working with collaboratively for many years, supported here by a second group of models and guest starring musicians”. 

Another step in the artist career for a social and human poetic message that, after a year of social distancing, gathers together the importance to be re-united and alive. 

 

Anne Imhof Angst (2016). Photo- Nadine Fraczkowski, courtesy Kunsthalle Basel. News 28 Oct 2016.

 

Anne Imhof, Faust [Eliza Douglas]. Photo © Nadine Fraczkowski. Courtesy German Pavilion 2017 & the artist.

 

Cover image: Anne Imhof, Faust [Eliza Douglas]. Photo © Nadine Fraczkowski. Courtesy German Pavilion 2017 & the artist.

Written by Rossella Farinotti

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