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"Woe to the painting that shows nothing beyond the finite! The merit of the painting is the indefinable: that which precisely eludes precision."

Eugène Delacroix

Until a few years ago judged by the Italian art system as anachronistic or merely commercial, figurative painting is enjoying a clear and progressive comeback, demonstrating not only its ability to survive in a world in which the image is increasingly digital but, above all, to be a language capable of communicating with its own contemporaneity, taking on its new codes and evolving in step with the new visual culture. Synergies are created between expressive languages, painting and photography often merge putting one at the service of the other, offering new possibilities for image composition. Examples of this are the works of Adelisa Selimbašić and Ludovic Thiriez: both find in photography one of the starting points for the construction of scenes but, while Thiriez takes firsthand photographs that he will later use as a trace for his paintings, Selimbašić performs a real research aimed at finding that image that captures his attention and can be functional in conveying the artist's intention. The works of Adelisa Selimbašić (Karlsruhe, 1996) are brightly colored visions that create surreal atmospheres in which moments of everyday life are fulfilled, experienced by female bodies without a precise identity: the artist does not define the characters by giving them a face but by emphasizing their gestures and postures, flaws and imperfections condemned by contemporary society in the name of a perfection that does not exist, revealing their hypocrisy and restoring lightness. As in Adelisa's works, in those of Ludovic Thiriez (Courbevoie, 1984) one finds dreamlike and surreal atmospheres inhabited by the human figure not represented as an identity but as a presence that fits perfectly into a dimension of harmonious coexistence between the natural world and the animal world. The human figure becomes an instrument of investigation of contemporaneity for the artist who never stops questioning. Painting has always been here. What has changed (perhaps) is the gaze that now turns to it, a gaze aware that figuration is not mimesis of reality as an end in itself but an alphabet that articulates complexly beyond the didactic representation of the scene.

Federica Picco

Gallery partner: IPERCUBO, Milan

 

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