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The Goblet #2

2021

Single piece

From the series SOILED

Size

30 x 40 x 30 cm
11.81 x 16 x 11.81 in

Reference

562dceb1

Year

2021

Medium

Sculpture

The Goblet #2:  2021 - Glass, wood, paint, pigments. Inside glasses: salts, pigments, silicone polymer 42 x 30 x 30 cm - Unique work

Soiled the Goblet: 

′′No human being is an island, ended in itself. Everyone is part of the continent, a piece of the mainland," wrote English poet John Donne in 1624.

John Donne saw the human being as a microcosm that mirrored and was the run through of the great macrocosmos. He also, clearly, saw human beings as soil. Or Soiled, if you wish. However, this idea of man and the world as tangled in the Western cultural circle was gradually replaced by another mind-set where humans were kept separate from the web of life. These errors of Cartesian dualism became part of the organizing structures of power in an era of colonial conquest of the rest of the world, and are currently part of the continued structural violence1 of our economic and political system. This violence is embedded in the ordinary, taken-for-granted patterns of the way the world, and has its continued manifestation throughout–and within–our bodies.

Soiled is, simply put, an installation of drinking glasses on soil-filled pedestals on tables. The drinking glasses are, in this instance, referred to as goblets, as the etymology of the word goblet leads back to the act of ingesting, and ingesting is– simply put–the point. Every piece of matter we ingest is suffused with its own stories, connections, and meanings that intersect with our own stories and our own bodies. Research suggests that our environment not only manifests in our biology, but is carried forward at the molecular level through epigenetics, causing changes that affect the way our genes work, and can be passed on to future generations.

For Soiled, each goblet is filled with a range of materials that all refer back to the human body and the soil they are standing in, and their interconnected narratives. Inside the goblets, the materials crystallise, ferment and grow together, active forces creating new growths and new connections– just as the materials we ingest. There is–for example– the 150-year old Washington charcoal that still smells like deep smoke with its entwined stories of mining, woodlands, and black lungs, oscillating together with the logwood extract from a spiny tree largely found in Mexico and exported by the Spanish in the 16th century, with its rich purple tones and stories of soils and colonialization. There are also, amongst others, red seaweed carrageenan and red sugar crystal marshmallows and what material processes and relationships they–literally–bring to the table.

ANE GRAFF is Born in 1974, Bodø, Norway. Lives and works in Oslo, Norway.

STATEMENT

Ane Graff’s artistic practice is informed by feminist new materialisms’ ongoing re-thinking of our material reality, in which a relational and process-oriented approach to matter -including the matter of living bodies- plays an integral part. Within this framework, Graff focuses on human and non-human relationships; viewing human beings as part of an expansive, material network, stretching inside and outside of our bodies. Her work traces the lines of Western intellectual history to ask how the ideas of human exceptionalism, Cartesian dualism and representational thinking all relate to the ecological disasters we face today, and furthermore, what seem to be their current and future implications for material bodies. As the material meetings of our time are new, Graff sees all material bodies as part of an ongoing material experiment, where new substances are being added to the mix (through industrial production and pollution), causing an entangled web of changes and promoting new bodily states. Collaborating with scientists, Graff’s sculptural works often incorporate experimental materials such as bacterial pigments, hair dye, meat glue, phytoestrogens and SSRI antidepressant medications.

1974 Oslo, Norway

Ane Graff’s artistic practice is informed by feminist new materialisms’ ongoing re-thinking of our material reality, in which a relational and process-oriented approach to matter—including the matter of living bodies—plays an integral part. Within this framework, Graff focuses on human and non-human relationships; viewing human beings as part of an expansive, material network, stretching inside and outside of our bodies.

Graff’s work traces the lines of Western intellectual history to ask how the ideas of human exceptionalism, Cartesian dualism and representational thinking all relate to the ecological disasters we face today, and furthermore, what seem to be their current and future implications for material bodies. As the material meetings of our time are new, she sees all material bodies as part of an ongoing material experiment, where new substances are being added to the mix (through industrial production and pollution), causing an entangled web of changes and promoting new bodily states. Collaborating with scientists, Graff’s sculptural works often incorporate experimental materials such as bacterial pigments, hair dye, meat glue, phytoestrogens and SSRI antidepressant medications.


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Address

Milano, foro Buonaparte, 68

Tempesta Gallery was born in 2020, the year of potential change. With a declared mission, the gallery undertakes a direct and frontal dialogue on the relationships between human beings, Nature and the various socio-cultural ecosystems. The gallery proposes urgent and recurring themes that vary from the anthropocene to gender, faced with a unique way of co...

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