Home Artists Dominik Schmitt

Dominik Schmitt

1983
Germany

28 Works exhibited on Kooness

Represented by

Category

Works by Dominik Schmitt

Heart Duck

2014

12.7 x 17.8cm

792,76 €

Flowers

2014

20.3 x 25.4cm

1212,46 €

Cubus

2014

25.4 x 30.5cm

2005,22 €

Church of Nature

2014

90 x 130cm

4663,31 €

Budgie

2014

17.8 x 24.1cm

1119,19 €

Woman

2015

80 x 100cm

4010,45 €

Fat Ribs

2015

79 x 51cm

3357,58 €

Stairwayerclimbert

2017

150 x 180cm

7461,29 €

Pig

2017

100 x 140cm

5316,17 €

Baby IV

2017

50 x 60cm

2331,65 €

To Poke Around

2018

40 x 50cm

1678,79 €

Smiley

2018

40 x 50cm

1678,79 €

Dog

2018

50 x 60cm

2984,52 €

Dark Duck Doc Dog

2018

50 x 60cm

2984,52 €

Oasis

2019

180 x 200cm

9046,82 €

Jack the Cat

2019

50 x 60cm

2984,52 €

Without Cocaine Spaniel

2021

80 x 100cm

4196,98 €

Talking About Antlers

2021

50 x 60cm

3077,78 €

Skully

2021

60 x 80cm

3637,38 €

Pille Palle

2021

50 x 60cm

3077,78 €

Flour Blatherer

2021

30 x 40cm

2051,86 €

Dove

2021

50 x 60cm

3077,78 €

Donald Dumb (I Can't Brathe)

2021

100 x 140cm

6155,57 €

Dog Face

2021

50 x 60cm

3077,78 €

Cupboard

2021

30 x 60cm

3077,78 €

Color Changing Flutter

2021

80 x 100cm

4196,98 €

Butterfly

2021

100 x 80cm

4196,98 €

Astra Cynic

2021

80 x 100cm

4196,98 €

Born in 1983, Dominik Schmitt is a painter born to Neustadt, Germany. Every young artist today faces great challenges in view of the past centuries of art and art history and the overwhelming diversity and possibilities found on the art market. How can I find my own way in this “jungle,” assert myself as an artist, and develop a characteristic and recognizable “handwriting”?

Dominik Schmitt creates pictures that are idiosyncratic in the best sense of the word, that catch the eye, that linger in the memory. Pictures that the viewer cannot possibly grasp at first glance due to their complexity and richness of detail. Should he nonetheless try to do so, he will be easily deceived. First of all, there is the dark coloration with a rich spectrum of broken black, gray, and earth tones, resulting in an unsettling and slightly melancholic basic mood. In terms of motifs, Schmitt’s paintings confront us with glimpses into the inner workings of human and animal life. Although the figurative dominates, the creatures in Schmitt’s pictorial world are always highly idiosyncratic beings from an in between realm, located beyond reality. Again and again we encounter amalgams of human and animal, often with limbs deformed or out of proportion. They sometimes seem to almost jump out of the picture – possessing a terrible beauty and fascination in their uniqueness, in their otherness. One might feel a bit transported to the world of figures found on the capitals and among the gargoyles of Romanesque and Gothic churches, or in the depictions of hell of a Hieronymus Bosch or Pieter Breughel – a playful approach to the unfathomable and the frightening.